MODULES

ORGANIZATION PROFILE AND PRODUCTIVITY

This set of indicators comprises a number of variables and facts about a company or organization including location, size, industry, type of organization and financial metrics. It also contains gender-sensitive productivity indicators such as absenteeism and turnover

SUBPILLARS

  • General descriptive data on the company or organization
  • Financial metrics (Return on Equity, Return on Invested Capital, Return on Sales and others)
  • Gender-sensitive productivity indicators

PERSONNEL PROFILE

Gathers the perspective and experience of employees in a company or organization, specifically pertaining to the presence or absence of women in relation to men on a variety of levels (e.g. the ratio of men and women in leadership positions, departments, or members of the Board of Directors).

SUBPILLARS

  • General ratio of men and women in a company or organization (participation rate by sex)
  • Horizontal distribution (sex-disaggregated by occupation and department)
  • Vertical distribution (sex dissagregated by level of responsibility)
  • Gender gap in management and other positionsDistribution of employees by type of contract
  • Distribution of employees by type of work day

RECRUITMENT, SELECTION AND HIRING

Information which enables the evaluation of recruitment, selection and hiring processes in companies from a gender perspective, assessing whether they produce gender gaps.

SUBPILLARS

  • Recruitment and selection
  • Hiring
  • Personnel assessment/perception of recruitment, selection and hiring processes

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND PERFORMANCE

Gathers the perspective and experience of employees in a company or organization, specifically pertaining to the presence or absence of women in relation to men on a variety of levels (e.g. the ratio of men and women in leadership positions, departments, or members of the Board of Directors).

SUBPILLARS

  • General ratio of men and women in a company or organization (participation rate by sex)
  • Horizontal distribution (sex-disaggregated by occupation and department)
  • Vertical distribution (sex dissagregated by level of responsibility)
  • Gender gap in management and other positionsDistribution of employees by type of contract
  • Distribution of employees by type of work day

REMUNERATION

Compiles information that allows for evaluation of whether the remuneration that women and men receive from companies and organizations in their receipt of fair wages according to the principle of equal pay for work of equal value.

SUBPILLARS

  • Remuneration
  • Personnel assessment/perception of wage policy

PREVENTION OF SEXUAL AND SEX-BASED HARASSMENT IN THE WORKPLACE

Compiles information needed to measure the existence or lack of measures to prevent and act upon cases of sexual and sex-based harassment in the workplace, the ratio of cases that occurred to those reported, and the impact of addressing and resolving those cases.

SUBPILLARS

  • Sexual and sex-based harassment
  • Personnel assessment/perception of harassment prevention policy
  • Personnel assessment and degree of knowledge of the effectiveness of mechanisms that companies or organizations facilitate to prevent and act against this type of gender-based violence (sex-based and sexual harassment)

WORK-LIFE BALANCE WITH SHARED SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

Assesses whether work-libe balance policies with shared responsibility offer equal opportunitiy for men and women, or if a gender bias exists. Measures the existence, degree of knowledge and rate of utilization of work-life balance measures

SUBPILLARS

  • Paid leave (maternity and paternity)
  • Unpaid leave (temporary leave of absence to care for dependents and other measures)
  • Flexible working arrangements including workspace and schedule
  • Personnel assessment/perception and degree of knowledge of the work-life balance policy

COMMUNICATION

This set of indicators measures the degree of gender equality in the management of internal and external communications

SUBPILLARS

  • Internal communication without gender bias
  • Assessment/perception of communication and channels/mechanisms for internal communication
  • External communication without gender bias
  • Assessment/perception of communication and channels/mechanisms for external communication

SUPPLY CHAIN

Companies which are not well informed about the context and the conditions of the actors within their supply chain are more likely to be reinforcing and legitimizing inequalities, in particular against women workers. Ensuring a gender perspective crosscuts the supply chain matters to the business sector because women make up the majority in the lowest paid and most precarious jobs in the supply chain – particularly migrant women, domestic workers, and those employed in low-skilled jobs; and are increasing their participation in global primary production chains. It also matters because women face workplace discrimination, sexual harassment, and other forms of violence, to a much greater extent than men, particularly in global supply chains.

The business sector also should care about their gender impacts across their value chains because women owned businesses, most of them SMEs linked to their supply chains, have much less access to business development opportunities. Women-owned businesses, mostly micro and small businesses, face a wide variety of financial and non-financial barriers that prevent their development and full participation in the formal economy and supply chains, particularly in global supply chains. Promoting women owned SMEs access to procurement opportunities not only enables more business opportunities for women, but also provides the buying companies with greater opportunities to access the best and most suitable suppliers. Undoubtedly when buying companies ignore the economic potential of women owned businesses, and the obstacles and challenges they face to access supply chains, they lose enormous commercial opportunities.

Some actions or measures that organizations can implement include:

  • Integrating gender equality into the company’s supply chain management and communicating its commitment to gender equality and women’s empowerment to its suppliers.
  • Diversifying its suppliers base or increasing its purchases from women owned business.
  • Influencing (informing, sensitizing, prioritizing, demanding) the way in which providers of goods and services treat their staff, particularly women. This influence can go from communicating and raising awareness among suppliers, to prioritizing those suppliers that meet certain criteria, or even insisting that their suppliers meet certain criteria in order to continue working with them.
  • Establishing alliances with third party entities such as, NGOs, unions, business organizations, and supporting processes and projects that promote gender equality and the empowerment of women in the value chain